277; JESUS’S 3 AUTHENTIC BIBLICAL QUOTATIONS

This is category 8 of  Zingcreed‘s Post “Jesus’s 5200 authentic words“. 1% of Jesus’s words as authenticated by the Jesus Seminar (upon whom be peace) were quotations from the Bible, i.e. from the Hebrew Scriptures (aka the Old Testament), as the Greek Scriptures (aka the New Testament) obviously hadn’t been written yet.

The translation used is the Scholar’s Version (Jesus Seminar) (i) (ii)

(i) “You are not to put the Lord your God to the test” (Deut 6:16, quoted in Mt 4:7 and Lk 4:12)

(ii) “Get out of here, Satan! Remember, it is written,’You are to pay homage to the Lord your God, and you are to revere him alone.’ ” (Deut. 6:13, quoted in Mt 4:10 and Lk 4:8)

(iii) “Then he started teaching and would say to them ‘Don’t the scriptures say ‘My house is to be regarded as a house of prayer for all peoples’? –  but you have turned it into a ‘hideout for crooks’!”
( Jer. 7:11 & Isa. 56:7; quoted in Mk 11: 15, 17)

Some thoughts:-

  • The first 2 quotes are from the same chapter as the Shema prayer (see Posts, listed below) which Jesus prayed twice every day. Every Jew and Christian would surely have been very familiar with these verses.
  • In both cases, Jesus is arguing with Satan. (See Post on Wilderness) In fact Satan is apparently vanquished by these quotes. (See Post on Catholic Exorcism – they require a lot more than just that!)
  • As nobody was present during these clashes, how do we know what was said? Did Jesus give a blow-by-blow account to a third party later? Perhaps he was hallucinating from lack of food and water? How else could anyone imagine they saw imaginary beings like Satan and (afterwards) angels? I’m leaning over backwards to understand Jesus here.
  • Interestingly, no-one seems to have noticed that the point of this ‘temptations in the wilderness’ narrative is that all power and political authority comes from the devil!
    “It has all been given to him (the devil) and he gives it to whom he wills. Those who hold political power receive it from him and depend upon him. This fact is no less important than the fact that Jesus rejects the devil’s offer. Jesus does not say to the devil: It is not true. You do not have power over kingdoms and states. He does not dispute this claim. he refuses the offer of power because the devil demands that he should fall down before him and worship him. This is the sole point when he utters Quotation (ii). We may thus say that among Jesus’ immediate followers and in the first Christian generation, political authorities – what we call the state – belonged to the devil and those who held power received it from him.” (Jacques Ellul) (iii)
  • The third quote is part of  the ‘money lenders in the temple’ scene. As the money exchangers’ actions contradict the Scriptures – or at least Jesus’s interpretation of them – he feels justified in employing violence against these proto-capitalists who were carrying out an indispensible function with the full approval of the temple authorities. Lambs and other animals required by pilgrims who wanted to make a sacrifice in the temple, could only be bought in local currency, not in the other currencies used around the empire which pilgrims brought with them: hence the need for money changers. Or so I’ve been told.

 

Related Zingcreed Posts:
The Shema
Wilderness
Exorcism: the Catholic service against Satan and the rebellious angels
Demons are for dorks
Angels my arse!
Jesus 5200 authentic words
Jesus’s real political message
(1) the 14 authentic parables
(2)
the 15 authentic kingdom statements
(3) preaching
(4)
19 authentic instructions to followers
(5)
the 17 authentic pearls of wisdom (aphorisms)
(6) healing words
(7)Talks to the disciples
(8) the 3 biblical quotations
(9)
authentic words of prayer
(10)
20 words about himself
The doubts of Robert Funk of the Jesus Seminar

Sources:
(i) Funk, R.W. and the Jesus Seminar “The gospel of Jesus according to the Jesus seminar” Polebridge Press (1999)
(ii) Funk, R.W. & Hoover, R.W. and the Jesus Seminar “The Five Gospels. What did Jesus really say?” Harper (1993)
(iii) Ellul, J. “Anarchy and Christianity” Eerdmans (1988) p.58

[277 linked & indexed, t&c]

 

 

 

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